Latest News

Coral Davenport

New York Times Reporter Coral Davenport Analyzes Prospects for Climate Policy for Incoming Biden Administration in Latest Episode of "Environmental Insights"

November 19, 2020

CAMBRIDGE MA. – Even with a new presidential administration in place in January, Coral Davenport, climate desk reporter at the New York Times, says it will still be a heavy lift to pass any meaningful legislation on climate change anytime soon. Davenport shared her thoughts on how climate policy – both domestically and internationally – may be affected by the outcome of this month’s U.S. elections in the latest episode...

Read more about New York Times Reporter Coral Davenport Analyzes Prospects for Climate Policy for Incoming Biden Administration in Latest Episode of "Environmental Insights"
Jason Bordoff

Former White House Advisor Jason Bordoff Analyzes Prospects for Green Energy Investments in the Biden-Harris Administration in HPCA Virtual Forum

November 13, 2020

Author: Doug Gavel

Former White House advisor Jason Bordoff, professor and founding director of the Center on Global Energy Policy at Columbia University School of International and Public Affairs (SIPA), says the incoming Biden-Harris Administration will have the opportunity to both lift the nation out of recession and combat global climate change by crafting a thoughtful economic...

Read more about Former White House Advisor Jason Bordoff Analyzes Prospects for Green Energy Investments in the Biden-Harris Administration in HPCA Virtual Forum
Lisa Friedman

New York Times Climate Desk Reporter Lisa Friedman Offers Insights on the 2020 Election Impacts on Climate Policy in Latest Episode of "Environmental Insights"

October 30, 2020

CAMBRIDGE MA. – With the 2020 US presidential and congressional election quickly approaching, Lisa Friedman, climate desk reporter at the New York Times, shared her thoughts on how climate policy could be affected by the election results in the newest episode of Environmental Insights: Discussions on Policy and Practice from the Harvard Environmental Economics...

Read more about New York Times Climate Desk Reporter Lisa Friedman Offers Insights on the 2020 Election Impacts on Climate Policy in Latest Episode of "Environmental Insights"
More

Learn about HEEP

HEEP is a university-wide initiative addressing today's complex environmental challenges and is based in the Harvard Kennedy School’s Mossavar-Rahmani Center for Business and Government. Learn more by reading director Robert Stavins' welcome message.

Environmental Insights Podcast

Environmental Insights Podcast on Soundcloud

Recent Publications

Aldy, Joseph E., and Robert N. Stavins. “Rolling the Dice in the Corridors of Power: William Nordhaus's Impacts on Climate Change Policy.” Harvard Environmental Economics Program Discussion Paper Series (2020).Abstract
The seminal contributions of William Nordhaus to scholarship on the long-run macroeconomics of global climate change are clear. Much more challenging to identify are the impacts of Nordhaus and his research on public policy in this domain. We examine three conceptually distinct pathways for that influence: his personal participation in the policy world; his research’s direct contribution to the formulation and evaluation of public policy; and his research’s indirect role informing public policy. Many of the themes that emerge in this assessment of the contributions of one of the most important economists to have worked in the domain of climate change analysis apply more broadly to the roles played by other leading economists in this and other policy domains.
Metcalf, Gilbert, and James H. Stock. “Measuring the Macroeconomic Impact of Carbon Taxes.” Harvard Environmental Economics Program Discussion Paper Series (2020).Abstract
Economists have long argued that a carbon tax is a cost effective way to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. Increasingly, members of Congress agree. In 2019, seven carbon tax bills were filed in Congress (Kaufman et al., 2019). In addition, the Climate Leadership Council has built bipartisan support for a carbon tax and dividend plan (Baker et al., 2017). In contrast, the Trump Administration is retreating from any climate policy and has taken steps to withdraw from the Paris Accord, citing heavy economic costs to the U.S. economy from meeting the U.S. commitments made during the Obama Administration. In his June 1, 2017 statement on the Accord, for example, the President claimed that the cost to the economy would be “close to \$3 trillion in lost GDP and 6.5 million industrial jobs…” (Trump, 2017). What is the basis for claims about the economic impact of a carbon tax? Economic impacts of a carbon tax typically are estimated using computable general equilibrium (CGE) models (as was done for the report on which Trump based his claims). These models, while helpful, make many simplifying assumptions to remain tractable, including optimization, representative agents, and simplified expectations and dynamics, so at a minimum those estimates would ideally be complemented by empirical evidence on the macroeconomic effects of carbon taxes in practice. With carbon taxes in place in twenty-five countries around the world, including some dating to the early 1990s, empirical analysis of historical experience is now possible. This paper considers carbon taxes in Europe to estimate their impact on GDP and employment.
More

News from the Harvard Project on Climate Agreements

Upcoming Events

More

HPCA Conversations on Climate Change and Energy Policy

The Harvard Project on Climate Agreements is conducting a series of virtual forums addressing key issues in climate-change and related energy policy. Each forum will feature an expert guest and will be moderated by Robert Stavins, Director of the Harvard Project. 

We hope you can join us!

Next Scheduled Event: TBD

To access recordings and transcripts of past events, please go to the HPCA Conversations Series webpage.

 

<embed>
Copy and paste this code to your website.
Copy and paste this code to your website.